ACCIDENTAL BILLIONAIRES EBOOK

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The Accidental Billionaires: The Founding of Facebook: A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius and Betrayal by Ben Mezrich. Read online, or download in secure EPUB . Read "The Accidental Billionaires The Founding of Facebook: A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius and Betrayal" by Ben Mezrich available from. Editorial Reviews. From Bookmarks Magazine. Mezrich forsakes the technical and business ichwarmaorourbia.tk: The Accidental Billionaires: The Founding of Facebook: A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius and Betrayal eBook: Ben Mezrich: site Store.


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NATIONAL BESTSELLER “The Social Network, the much anticipated movie adapted from Ben Mezrich's book The Accidental Billionaires.” —The New York. cover image of The Accidental Billionaires. Read A Sample Billionaires. Sex, Money, Betrayal and the Founding of Facebook. by Ben Mezrich. ebook. NATIONAL BESTSELLER “The Social Network, the much anticipated movie adapted from Ben Mezrich's book The Accidental Billionaires.”.

Also, I never quite understood what his role in the company was. Their money would come from a different form of advertising similar to the model that Google was using down the road from where Zuckerberg and Facebook were holed up in California.

The finals club he was a part of was probably a large part of how so many people signed up so quickly. If he had helped them launch the site would it have been the social networking site that everyone would be using today? Probably not, it probably would have been a more college aimed version of Friendster, if it ever even became anything outside of the Harvard community. I felt like there was something missing in the story of his being ousted from Facebook.

There are hints that Parker thought there was a conspiracy at play, but a large portion of this story seems to be missing.

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View 2 comments. Oct 26, Grace rated it did not like it Shelves: If I could find a way to delete my Facebook account and still remain in contact with my family and close friends, I'd do it after reading this book. I'll start with the story itself. I call it a story because author Ben Mezrich admits that he fictionalized scenes based on eye witness accounts and made up others to fill in gaps.

Mezrich was also unable to secure an interview with Mark Zuckerberg, the mastermind behind Facebook. How do you write the story of the founding of Facebook without the fo If I could find a way to delete my Facebook account and still remain in contact with my family and close friends, I'd do it after reading this book.

How do you write the story of the founding of Facebook without the founder? The correct answer should be that you don't, but not if you are Ben Mezrich. There was not a single likable character in the entire story. Mark Zuckerberg was portrayed as a narcissist hacker who used people until their usefulness was gone and then tossed them aside without a care. Interview or no interview, I think I believe this interpretation of Mark because it would explain why Facebook randomly changes for the worse without any notice or recourse to reverse the changes.

Mark's variety of business partners: Eduardo, the Winklevoss Twins who placed sixth in crew at Beijing Olympics! It was all petty, "high school" antics in an Ivy League setting - freezing business accounts, telling the President of Harvard that someone stole your idea It made me sick to my stomach to think that Harvard University with the exception of Sean Parker - he was just a leech looking to latch on to the next big thing is the sandbox in which the world's up and coming movers and shakers can whine, make calls to daddy, and use women for sex, preferably in a bathroom stall while your friend bangs a girl in the next stall over.

Oh and this book's portrayal of college women was disgusting. I went to college granted, it wasn't an Ivy League college , but there was a lot more to it than getting laid.

Women were compared to farm animals for entertainment or the prize to win, sleep with, and discard. The one serious relationship in the whole book ends in a dorm room blaze when Eduardo's girlfriend burns a present he gave her, all of his clothes, and sets her room on fire. She's referred to as crazy. Okay, maybe she earned the crazy, but treating women like objects isn't okay with me and I'm sure Harvard University isn't happy with the portrayal either. And now for the last key part of this story - Harvard University.

After reading this book, I want to delete my facebook and I'm incredibly thankful I didn't go to Harvard University. I am certain that this is not the type of press Harvard is after. Mezrich speaks about Harvard like it is the only university in the United States of America. It is the only school with core courses for a well rounded education. Only Harvard has dorms that are cooler than other dorms or dorms that are way off in the middle of nowhere.

The Accidental Billionaires (Kobo eBook)

I'm all about school spirit, but Ben Mezrich's portrayal of Harvard is incredibly elitist, yet incredibly insulting all at the same time. Here is what I learned about Harvard: Harvard is about getting laid and treating women like crap.

Harvard is the pre-school of the Ivy League where kids can squabble, bicker, back stab, and commit other childish acts and still become the richest men in America. I really hope that there was a considerable decline in riders of the Fuck Truck after publication of this book. This is my first time reading Ben Mezrich and I know I won't do it again. He takes too much creative license in non-fiction work. His writing style is incredibly immature. The Accidental Billionaires reads like a romance novel for high school computer science geeks.

It's clunky, awkward, and uses sex in all the wrong places. It also made me wonder when the author last got laid I am thankful that this was a quick read so I can move on to something else, something with merit and substance.

Sep 04, Jsnyder02 rated it it was ok. Why do people like Ben Mezrich? This story itself, about Facebook, was fascinating and kept me reading.

The author, however, made me want to vomit. He made it clear he knew nothing about the subject matter, by describing technological aspects of the story in ways that didn't make any sense no, he doesn't need to be a website creator himself, but he has to develop enough basic vocabulary to write intelligently. Also, he wrote this book without being able to get an in Why do people like Ben Mezrich? Also, he wrote this book without being able to get an interview with Mark Zukerberg!

I realize that isn't Mezrich's fault, but it definitely leaves a big gap in the book. Finally, at points in the story where Mezrich didn't know what happened, he just made crap up! He freely admits this, but in many places, I think it would've been better left unsaid. For example, in one case where Mark breaks into a residence hall to gain access to their student photo site, he describes an amorous couple in the background making out, in great detail.

Obviously, since he didn't get an interview with Mark, he has no way of knowing whether this actually happened, so what is the point of concocting that?

Assuming that people reading about the founding of Facebook are looking for a cheap romance novel? View 1 comment. Anyone who wants to be an entrepreneur can enjoy this work. An enjoyable read and much to learn from. Oct 24, Vivian Valvano rated it did not like it. BUT I worried when I saw it. I knew that it was not a bio-pic in any way, shape, or form. I knew that it could not be taken as documentary in any way, shape, or form, and that Mark Zuckerberg had nothing to do with it. Now, I have just read the book on which the film is "based," according to the film's credits and promotional materials, and I am totally aghast.

The book is a piece of junk. Ben Mezrich cannot write. His grammar is atrocious e. As far as I can see, he had exactly one real, on the record source, Eduardo Saverin. This makes my discomfort at the level of accuracy very strong indeed. He claims at one point to have "dozens of sources - some direct witnesses, some indirect," whatever that means, but apart from Saverin, "these sources have asked to remain anonymous.

And I don't see how too many of the documents could have been court proceeding records since the lawsuit of the Winklevoss twins against Zuckerberg and Facebook was settled and sealed by the judge, and the records of the suits between Saverin and Zuckerberg have not been made public.

Certainly, Mezrich could have read many emails, which couldn't have been too taxing. Let me allow him to speak for himself here, because this is so ludicrous that it defies paraphrase: Other scenes are written in a way that describes individual perceptions without endorsing them.

I do employ the technique of re-created dialogue.

I have based this dialogue on the recollections of participants of the substance of conversations. Some of the conversations recounted in this book took place over long periods of time, in multiple locations, and thus some conversations and scenes were re-created and compressed.

Rather than spread these conversations out, I sometimes set these scenes in likely settings. As Daria's theme song says, "You're standing on my neck!

I am at a loss to understand why Sorkin got involved with him at all. I really can't understand how Sorkin and Fincher made such a good film if this book was at the root.

(ebook) Summary: The Accidental Billionaires Ben Mezrich

Sorkin and Fincher are real talents; Mezrich is not. They created a noteworthy piece of work that tells a good story although, again, and it must be emphasized, not the factual record of the creation of Facebook ; Mezrich wrote I refuse to say created a third-rate mess that is neither non-fiction, nor investigative journalism, nor historical fiction, nor good, creative fiction loosely suggested by real persons and occurrences.

Memo to "Law and Order" franchise: I wonder why Zuckerberg didn't sue Mezrich. Then again, the almost sourceless book is so bad and is filled with so many constructions like "perhaps," "maybe," "one can imagine," "likely," "the odds are good that," and my personal favorite - "we can picture Mark reading the words on the business card aloud to himself" that I certainly can understand Zuckerberg ignoring the whole thing.

He is, after all, a computer genius.

Apr 07, Lili Manolache rated it it was amazing. The ideology of the new generation includes without any doubt the giant Facebook. It has become part of the social evolution of our century and it has reached even the basic unit of society: In my opinion, Facebook is the tool we use nowadays for both personal and business activities.

Each of us is influenced by what this social networking platform has become. View all 5 comments. Dec 13, Tom rated it it was ok. Here is one of the rare cases where I say the film "The Social Contract" is better than the book.

Mezrich's version of Facebook's founding is a fast read but one told primarily through the eyes and voice of Eduardo Saverin, the partner who has claimed he was cheated and misled by Facebook originator Mark Zuckerberg. Since the book was published in early , we don't know yet the final outcome of Saverin's litigation against Here is one of the rare cases where I say the film "The Social Contract" is better than the book. Since the book was published in early , we don't know yet the final outcome of Saverin's litigation against Zuckerberg, nor the end result of a similar suit brought by the Winklevoss twins, the Harvard students who claim Zuckerberg stole their idea for a social network website.

It is clear the book falls in the "nonfiction novel" category, as Mezrich provides us not only with spoken dialogue but also interior thoughts as the various characters ascend in elevators, fly in jets, row sculls and size up drunken parties. Too many passages are introduced by ambivalent disclaimers like "Maybe somewhere inside of Mark's thoughts, he knew If the book was based primarily on information supplied by Saverin, it still leaves a great deal unanswered about Saverin's character and motives.

Just what was it about Zuckerberg, with the personality of an automaton, that attracted Saverin? As the book tells it, Zuckerberg was an awkward Harvard junior who had acquired some campus fame as a hacker of the university's computer system.

Saverin, a senior, is shown as admiring Zuckerberg's geekiness and chutzpah but also being frustrated by Z's aloof attitude. Saverin's other friends were fellow members of one of Harvard's private clubs -- typical smart-alecky, highly social frat boys.

So just what was it that made these two opposites bond? Saverin clearly was far more emotional about their friendship and apparently grew jealous when Zuckerberg left Cambridge and gravitated toward Napster party boy Sean Parker in Palo Alto. But the book doesn't spell out clearly what Saverin thought he would accomplish by freezing the Facebook bank account.

The book coyly hints there might have been more than a business partnership but stops short of alleging a gay component to their relationship. Yet Saverin's decision to drop his girlfriend and head off to a lonely career start-up in New York after his graduation certainly made me wonder. Perhaps some day Zuckerberg will give us a memoir that provides the other half of this story. May 27, Carol Storm rated it did not like it.

It's not shocking that this book is so bad.

Mark Zuckerberg has so much money and so much power that no one can force him to spill his guts. Lots of people resent that. But even assuming that the worst is true, about Mark and his empire, was Ben Mezrich the BEST author they could find to trash this guy? Ben Mezrich doesn't write like someone who loves books, or who enjoys reading. He writes like he is blind drunk in a frat house at 3 AM, and trying to impress the other guys with how cool he is.

It's so bad that at times you think it's some kind of scam, or he's pulling your leg. But he's not. Here's an example. All he really focused on was the idea of being connected, belonging, having hundreds and hundreds of hot girls climbing all over him, rubbing up against him. Mark could give him all these things -- all these things will I give you, Mark seemed to be saying, just like Dracula promising an endless feast of red-eyed rats to the quivering and submissive Renfield.

But that's only because I've read books and been influenced by them. One final note: People say Mark Zuckerberg is a gangster. Jan 22, Scribble Orca rated it liked it Recommends it for: If you aren't going to watch the film. This is not a high energy book!

You'll have a much better time watching the movie The Social Network I did, on the plane, from Munich to Singapore , you might even come away with a sense of who was nasty and who was nice, but reading the book is like eating white toast bread.

And disappointing. Being a firm believe of the old cliche that the book is better than the film, I was expecting to come away with some tangible insights. I didn't.

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It's nothing to do with Mezrich's skill as a w This is not a high energy book! It's nothing to do with Mezrich's skill as a writer. He remains dutifully even-handed from the first to the last page. It's simply because oh no, I'm doing it again, placing the author in his social context, slap my wrist!

Mezrich belongs to the same set of people about whom he is writing, and while he's keen to tell a story, he's also minding his "p"s and "q"s. You aren't going to get the real low-down on who did with what and stabbed whom how hard and for how much reading this book. You'll find out quite some background and if you like that, I recommend the book , and you might be left with equal quantities of sympathy for all the players insofar as they are depicted as being deserving of sympathy, which is an entirely subjective view-point.

But if actions speak louder than words, watch the film. Zuckerberg has reinstated Savarin as co-founder publically, and Saverin has received an undisclosed pay-out sum, the WV twins are now arguing that the valuation of Face-book has left them short-changed, and meanwhile Sean Parker still smiling. And while you're watching the film, keep in the back of your mind that Goodreads is a social network site.

If there are privacy and potential misuse issues surrounding your use of Facebook, be sure the same issues are only a few profile pages away here. I know. One of my friends was just hauled off the site for being too close to the industry. Apr 29, David rated it it was ok.

As possibly the last person in America not on Facebook, I was unfamiliar with the back story.

As might have been predicted, the college students who started it weren't prepared to handle the skyrocketing success, and friendships imploded in multiple lawsuits about who created what when and who was cheating whom on the money.

Unfortunately, the author was unable to get the single most central character, Mark Zuckerberg, to be interview quick, sometimes amusing, read about the creation of Facebook. Unfortunately, the author was unable to get the single most central character, Mark Zuckerberg, to be interviewed, which casts a long shadow over the credibility of the narrative. He comes across as a brilliant computer programmer with little human feeling for, or fairness to, his peers, but then again the sources for this account are people in litigation against him.

Author is clearly fascinated by the social whirlwind surrounding Harvard "finals clubs", relevance of which is minimal to the main story. Finally, if this account is even close to accurate, in my next life I want to come back as one of the twins who settled for 65 million bucks against Zuckerberg in a suit claiming he stole their idea.

They had a related but clearly not identical concept dating site exclusively for students at elite colleges , zero ability to make it happen, put up no money, and had no written contract with him. They trained for and made the US Olympic rowing team while Zuckerberg was doing the programming and marketing of Facebook nee "thefacebook".

Not a bad payoff for their investment of a couple planning meetings and emails with him re their idea. Hoping to keep a wary eye on the online exploits of my 13 year old daughter, I asked her if she would "friend" me on Instagram. She looked at me skeptically and said, "you should get Facebook - that's for old people.

This book by Ben Mezrich is theoretically about the founding of Facebook in on the campus of Harvard University, but mostly it's about how co-founder Mark Zuckerberg screwed over everyone involved in the company, and maybe everyone he ever met allegedly. Wait, you're s Hoping to keep a wary eye on the online exploits of my 13 year old daughter, I asked her if she would "friend" me on Instagram. Wait, you're saying to yourself, didn't I see a movie about this a few years ago?

Author Mezrich specializes in pseudo-non-fiction books see: Still, I continue to come back to Mezrich's books despite his numerous literary failings because the guy tells an amusing story, and some of it might even be true. The interplay between the principals in the birth and rise of Facebook is also entertaining, sort of like watching reality show idiots squabble over various issues - except of course in this case billions of dollars are at stake.

Cheap and tawdry, yet entertaining enough for a cross-country airplane trip - that's Mezrich's legacy in the publishing world. If you have seen the movie, The Social Network, you already know the plot. Filled with the purported conversations of college students from years ago, one must remain somewhat skeptical.

Mezrich, himself, says several of the characters are composites more red flags, and some reviewers have complained the book was too long and boring. I listened to it If you have seen the movie, The Social Network, you already know the plot. One does wonder what Zuckerberg might have accomplished had he been studying philosophy instead of computer science.

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Mostly the characters come across as very unhappy people. Amusing, but take with a block of salt. The author himself has noted elsewhere that he was making do with limited sources, but that the point of the book was not to be history but rather a commentary on the values of current culture.

I understand Bringing Down the House: The Inside Story of Six M. Students Who Took Vegas for Millions is a better representation of what the author can do. A big "eh.

He just tries too hard. I kept thinking he was trying to be a writer instead of actually being one "the white and blue-colored crepe paper I was interested to see I wasn't the only reader annoyed by this. Admittedly in later chapters, I found myself wanting to fin A big "eh. Admittedly in later chapters, I found myself wanting to finish the book and see how events played out that's why it'll get 2 stars. I'll agree with others that the story is half-told, but I think the author is pretty open about that.

I think the larger problem is that the writing feels rushed The other flaw is its style and use of stereotypes. I was interested to see some of the history behind FB So that was of interest. Interesting, maybe true maybe not.

And the book has little else to offer. I don't have time at the moment to write about the portrayal of women in this book. Whether this is Mezrich himself or as he says, using the thoughts of his sources, i. Mar 17, MissFabularian added it. Apr 10, Himal Kotelawala rated it liked it. It's easy to see why so many people seem to dismiss this book as a glorified beach read. At first glance, it's poorly written - and worse - hurriedly edited.

Admittedly, it is no masterpiece in terms of writing; but, ultimately, The Accidental Billionaires more than manages to accomplish what it sets out to: From Page 1 onwards, you It's easy to see why so many people seem to dismiss this book as a glorified beach read. From Page 1 onwards, you can almost hear author Mezrich's brain working furiously, behind the scenes, trying to strike that elusive balance between fact and fiction; and, to me, that was half the fun.

Mezrich's blatant second guessing of his own characterisations, for example, was as good a reason as any to keep on reading. And you've got to hand it to the guy for being bold enough to sacrifice consistency on the altar of accuracy, just to make sure that not one of the major players in his story came out looking like your stereotypical bad guy - or, as Mezrich would say, your average James Bond villain.

Be warned, there is quite a bit of references in there. Obviously, feeling bad for the writer is no reason to force yourself to read anything especially a story purportedly based on true, world-changing events ; and there are any number of reasons to give this novel a chance.

For one thing, it couldn't be more different from the movie it inspired. If you've seen David Fincher's The Social Network and loved it as I have, you'd probably think reading the lesser known and not half as respected source material would be redundant. You couldn't be more wrong. Where the movie arguably succeeds in making main character Mark Zuckerberg look like an asshole Hollywood being what it is , the book manages to stay focused on telling the story of Facebook, the end-all-be-all of social networking for now, anyway , giving equal screen time to all the major characters, inviting - practically begging - the reader make up their own mind.

And in my humble opinion, Mezrich does a pretty commendable job of getting most things right, especially given the circumstances, even if the writing could've been better. In the end, it was a satisfying read; and barring the indecently brisk pace of it, it was pretty engaging. Read it, not because you give a damn about pretentious literary conventions; read it because you care about a good, 21st century true-to-life account.

View all 3 comments. Although much of Ben Mezrich's information is sketchy at best, he writes a very engaging story of how much blood, sweat and tears were shed in the founding of Facebook. Though he no doubt interviewed some of the key players in this drama, the most important point of view is missingMark Zuckerberg's. The drama, ironically, revolves around Zuckerberg yet the author felt he had enough information from other sources to write a book about him. Top Pick. The Accidental Billionaires Ben Mezrich.

Ben Mezrich is a graduate of Harvard University. Bringing Down the House was the basis for the movie 21 which was released in spring, Mezrich is a columnist for Boston Common and a contributor to Flush magazine. What do you know about the Facebook phenomenon? Ben Mezrich recounts the story of the world's biggest social network and the world's youngest billionaire, Mark Zuckerberg.

The Accidental Billionaires tells how a company that was created to connect people ultimately tore two best friends apart. In , Eduardo Saverin and Mark Zuckerberg, two Harvard undergrads, were looking for a way to stand out among the university's elite student body.

The book tells how Mark crashed Harvard's network and created the social networking site that has since revolutionized the way people communicate. Filled with juicy stories, The Accidental Billionaires is a captivating story of betrayal, sex and money. For immediate download.

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Explanation The dispatch time will depend on the status of your item s at our warehouse. Problems with your delivery In the event that the courier company fails to deliver your order due to invalid address information, they will return the order back to Dymocks Online. Must Read Summaries. Trending Items in Business. Mark Wrice, Jaros? Stuart Kells, Ian D. Spencer Johnson.This is a fast paced book detailing the meteoric rise of Facebook and it's founders. July 14, Imprint: The Big Short: I check Facebook almost everyday and it is amazing to see the difference between the very first version of Facebook and the version many people use today.

But even assuming that the worst is true, about Mark and his empire, was Ben Mezrich the BEST author they could find to trash this guy? Mark Zuckerberg has so much money and so much power that no one can force him to spill his guts. Certainly, Mezrich could have read many emails, which couldn't have been too taxing.

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